Kate Augustine

UNC at Chapel Hill

Kate is a Biology PhD student in the Kingsolver lab. Kate is broadly interested in evolutionary ecology, plant-insect interactions, and the impacts of invasive plant species on higher trophic levels. She is currently working on a project investigating the effects of the invasive herb garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata) on the survival and evolution of the rare woodland butterfly known as the West Virginia White (Pieris virginiensis) and is soon to begin a project studying the effects of plant nutrition on thermal reaction norms and parasitism rates of Cabbage White caterpillars (Pieris rapae). Kate received her bachelor’s degree in Environmental Science from the University of Notre Dame in 2012.

Justin Baumann

UNC at Chapel Hill

Justin (@jbaumann3) is a second year PhD student in Karl Castillo’s coral physiology lab. He graduated with his MS in Geological Sciences from The Ohio State University in August 2013, and received his BS with Honors research distinction in Biology and Earth Sciences from OSU in 2011. His undergraduate research focused on the effects of single and repeat bleaching on photosynthesis, respiration, and feeding in Caribbean corals, and his Master’s work focused on the effects of temperature stress on the acquisition and allocation of carbon to lipids in Hawaiian corals Justin is also interested in ocean advocacy, marine policy, and conservation and is an author and co-founder of UNdertheCblog.

Casey Berger

UNC at Chapel Hill

Casey Berger is a PhD student in the Drut group in the UNC Physics and Astronomy Department. She studies computational many-body quantum mechanics. Casey is a Department of Energy CSGF fellow and recipient of the William Neal Reynolds Fellowship from the UNC Royster Society of Fellows. Casey received a BA in Philosophy, a BS in Film Production, and a minor in Spanish from Boston University in 2010. Following her graduation, she spent two years working in the film industry in Hollywood before returning to academia to complete a BS in Physics at The Ohio State University in 2015. While at Ohio State Casey was co-chair of the Society of Women in Physics (SWiP) and a member of the Mortar Board National Senior Honorary.

 

Eleanor Caves

Duke University

Eleanor is a second year Biology PhD Student. She graduated with a Master of Philosophy in Zoology from Cambridge University in 2012, and a Bachelor of Arts in Biology from Pomona College in 2011. She currently studies the evolution of camouflage in marine organisms, in particular how animals that need to be conspicuous to some viewers but hidden from others can balance those needs simultaneously, by exploiting the visual capabilities of those viewers. She has participated in several outreach activities in the Durham area, including the North Carolina Science Festival, and has been involved in a film-making workshop with the Duke/UNC group Scientists With Stories.

Patrick Green

Duke University

Patrick is a PhD student in the Biology Department. His research blends morphology, physiology, and animal behavior to examine the evolution of form and function in animal weapons. He specifically studies how mantis shrimp use their fast-moving raptorial appendages to strike each other during aggressive interactions, and what determines the winners and losers of fights. Patrick received his BS in Ecology, Behavior and Evolution from UCLA in 2009. He started his PhD at UMass, Amherst in 2011 before transferring with his advisor to Duke.

Kristen Hopperstad

NC State University

Kristen is an entomology doctoral student in Dr. Michael H. Reiskind’s vector ecology lab at NCSU. Originally from South Texas, she received her B.Sc. in Biology from the University of Texas-Pan American in 2011. Her doctoral research investigates a possible recrudescence of the infamous yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti, in the United States. Aedes aegypti was largely displaced by the invasive Asian tiger mosquito, but has the potential to rebound through local adaptation. Kristen uses landscape ecology studies and population genetic techniques to investigate the ongoing interplay between these two species with implications for mosquito control. She is also interested in mosquito control legislation and advocacy, and has served as the Chair and Past-Chair of the American Mosquito Control Association Young Professionals Committee since 2014.

Rebecca Lauzon

Duke University

Rebecca is a PhD student in Earth and Ocean Sciences at Duke University. She got her Bachelor of Arts in Marine Science from Boston University in 2013. Her current research focuses on the role of waves on marsh edge erosion rates in coupled barrier-island marsh systems. She has always been passionate about science outreach, and currently serves as the outreach coordinator for her department at Duke. In her free time, she volunteers at the Museum of Life and Science and the Duke Gardens. Rebecca participated in SciREN Triangle in 2014 before joining the team this year.

Lindsay Maudlin

NC State University

Lindsay is a PhD student in the Department of Marine, Earth, and Atmospheric Sciences. She received her B.S. in Meteorology from The University of Oklahoma in 2012 and her M.S. in Atmospheric Sciences from The University of Arizona in 2014. Lindsay is currently working in Dr. Karen McNeal’s Geoscience Education and Geocognition Lab and measures the engagement level and learning gains of students in informal education settings where the focus is on global change and other related topics.